Discrimination

  • June 11, 2024

    4th Circ. Says Md. Development Entity Immune From Bias Suit

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit alleging a Maryland economic development corporation fired a Black employee for complaining she'd been denied opportunities because of her race and gender, saying a lower court correctly ruled that the state organization is immune from her claims.

  • June 11, 2024

    Lacrosse Coach Loses Bias Suit After Getting Cozen Booted

    A Pennsylvania federal judge tossed a lawsuit Tuesday from a high school lacrosse coach who said her contract wasn't renewed because of gender, age and disability bias, finding the school district showed that its decision stemmed from concerns about her professionalism.

  • June 11, 2024

    Stanford Says Instructor's Firing Over Gaza Class Is Legit

    Stanford University has asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit by a Black Muslim lecturer who said he was let go after giving a controversial talk on the Gaza war, saying it didn't dismiss him because of his race, color or religion, but because he ran a bad classroom exercise.

  • June 11, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Labor And Employment Pro In San Diego

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP has hired as a partner for its employment law practice an attorney with prior private practice experience who has also worked for multiple companies and a labor union during her more than 20-year career.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ariz. Builder Settles EEOC Suit Over Late Workforce Data

    A homebuilder reached a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to end a suit claiming it failed to hand over its workforce demographic data, marking the latest settlement in a spate of recent EEOC suits challenging reporting requirement noncompliance.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Papa John's Driver's Race Harassment, Pay Suit Proceeds

    A Black former pizza delivery driver for a Papa John's franchise can pursue his claims that he faced a hostile work environment and was underreimbursed for mileage, an Alabama federal judge ruled, but the judge limited the methods the worker can use to prove his allegations.

  • June 11, 2024

    Gastropub, HR Firm Strike Deal To End EEOC Harassment Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Tuesday that a Honolulu gastropub and its human resources consultant have agreed to pay $115,000 to resolve a suit accusing the companies of allowing sexual harassment to run rampant in the restaurant.

  • June 10, 2024

    Weinstein Calls Accuser 'Brazen Liar' In Calif. Criminal Appeal

    Harvey Weinstein told a California appellate court that prejudicial rulings deprived him of a fair trial in the Golden State, arguing in his opening brief that the jury wrongfully heard evidence of uncharged sex assault offenses but never heard evidence that would have exposed his accuser as a "brazen liar."

  • June 10, 2024

    EEOC Says Auto Co. Got Rid Of Harassment Suit Evidence

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a Michigan federal court Monday that an automotive services company improperly deleted crucial emails, text messages and personnel records related to claims that it fired an employee after she reported that a supervisor was pressuring her for sex.

  • June 10, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-City Worker's Accommodation Suit

    The Ninth Circuit declined Monday to revive an employee's suit alleging the city he worked for used an argument he had with police officers as a cover-up to fire him because he requested leave to treat a knee injury, ruling that the worker lacked proof of prejudice.

  • June 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs CBP Win In Black Worker's Race Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit on Monday refused to reinstate a lawsuit a patrol officer brought against the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency alleging he was demoted because he's Black, saying no new trial is needed despite the worker's argument that the lower court wrongly excluded certain evidence.

  • June 10, 2024

    Introducing Law360's Pay Disclosure Law Tracker

    A movement to tackle discriminatory pay gaps has swept the U.S. in recent years as nearly half of states have enacted bans on salary history requests while almost a dozen have issued laws that require employers to share what they're willing to pay for a position. Law360 has created an interactive, nationwide map tracking these salary history bans and pay transparency requirements.

  • June 10, 2024

    2nd Circ. Upholds Toss Of Fired Cop's Race, Sex Bias Suit

    The Second Circuit refused Monday to revive a Black police officer's lawsuit alleging a New York town fired her after she hurt her back while allowing white men to take on light work or retire, finding she was treated the same as colleagues who weren't receiving disability benefits.

  • June 10, 2024

    Jury Says School Workers Owed $950K In COVID Bias Suit

    An Oregon federal jury said six education workers should get a combined $950,000 win in their religious bias suit claiming their school district illegally placed them on indefinite unpaid leave after approving their exemptions to its COVID-19 vaccination mandate.

  • June 10, 2024

    W.Va. Anti-Trans Sports Suit Stayed Amid High Court Bid

    A West Virginia federal judge has temporarily paused a lawsuit from a transgender minor challenging a state law that prohibits biological males from joining girls' teams, arguing it is not in the best interest of taxpayers to proceed while the U.S. Supreme Court weighs whether to take up the case.

  • June 10, 2024

    5th Circ. Upends Dallas School District Win In Age Bias Suit

    The Fifth Circuit reinstated a lawsuit from a Dallas school district worker who said she was passed over for promotions and fired because she was in her mid-50s, saying a trial court held her to too high a standard when it threw out her lawsuit.

  • June 10, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Booted From Pa. Equal Pay Case

    Cozen O'Connor has been booted off a Pennsylvania school district's equal-pay lawsuit that was being overseen by a judge with personal ties to the firm, according to an order the judge issued Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    FordHarrison Makes Associate Hires Across 5 Offices

    FordHarrison LLP announced that it made associate hires across five of the employment law firm's office locations including Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

  • June 10, 2024

    Duane Morris Rehires Employment Partner From Cooley

    A labor and employment attorney who spent nearly two decades at Duane Morris LLP has rejoined the firm after working at Cooley LLP the past few years.

  • June 10, 2024

    Live Urgent Care In-House Atty Axed For Pregnancy, Suit Says

    A former in-house attorney and compliance officer for Live Urgent Care LLC alleged in New Jersey state court on Friday that she was fired in retaliation for asking to take maternity leave and demanding a bonus she claims was never paid.

  • June 10, 2024

    Order Trims Cuomo Suit Over Harassment Probe Documents

    A New York state judge has partially dismissed a petition brought by former Gov. Andrew Cuomo seeking dozens of unredacted transcripts of witness interviews as part of the state attorney general's sexual harassment investigation that led to his 2021 resignation.

  • June 10, 2024

    EEOC Settles 2 Suits Over Late Demographic Data Reports

    A Georgia chicken processor and a New Jersey food distributor are the latest businesses to settle suits with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission after it targeted 15 companies for failing to submit mandatory workforce demographic reports to the government, according to Monday court filings.

  • June 10, 2024

    Treasury Dept. Beats IRS Agent's Religious Bias Suit

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury defeated an Internal Revenue Service agent's suit claiming he was disciplined for a three-day celebration of Easter mandated by his Christian faith, with a Florida federal judge finding the reprimand was based on performance rather than religion.

  • June 07, 2024

    Split 9th Circ. Revives LA Schools Vaccine Policy Row

    A split Ninth Circuit panel on Friday reversed a California federal court's dismissal of a proposed class action challenging a recently rescinded Los Angeles Unified School District policy requiring employees to get the COVID-19 vaccine to keep their jobs, ruling that the district still has the potential to reinstate it.

  • June 07, 2024

    Hospital Dodges Hostile-Workplace Claim In Race Bias Suit

    A federal court trimmed a state-level claim of hostile work environment and two allegations of racial bias from a Black former emergency room doctor at a hospital outside Philadelphia, but said there were enough questions of fact for other parts of her case to move ahead.

Expert Analysis

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

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    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Handling Neurodivergence As The Basis Of Disability Claims

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    Three recent discrimination claims in Rhode Island and New Jersey show how allegations of adverse treatment of neurodivergent individuals will continue to be tested in court, so employers should create an environment that welcomes the disclosure of such conditions, says Ting Cheung at Sanford Heisler.

  • Employers Should Take Surgeon's Sex Bias Suit As A Warning

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    A Philadelphia federal jury's recent verdict in a sex bias suit over Thomas Jefferson University's inaction on a male plaintiff's sexual harassment complaint is a reminder to employers of all stripes about the importance of consistently applied protocols for handling complaints, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

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    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Employer Pointers As Wage And Hour AI Risks Emerge

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    Following the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence, employers using or considering artificial intelligence tools should carefully assess whether such use could increase their exposure to liability under federal and state wage and hour laws, and be wary of algorithmic discrimination, bias and inaccurate or incomplete reporting, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • 6 Ways To Minimize Risk, Remain Respectful During Layoffs

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    With a recent Resume Builder survey finding that 38% of companies expect to lay off employees this year, now is a good time for employers to review several strategies that can help mitigate legal risks and maintain compassion in the reduction-in-force process, says Sahara Pynes at Fox Rothschild.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

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    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.