Discrimination

  • June 03, 2024

    3rd Circ. Backs Bad Subpoena Sanction In Race, Sex Bias Suit

    The Third Circuit has upheld a $6,720 fee sanction against a New Jersey attorney for serving an intentionally misleading subpoena while representing a Garden State management company against federal race and sex bias claims.

  • June 03, 2024

    Grocer Strikes Deal To Exit EEOC Sex Harassment Suit

    A grocery store chain agreed to pay $75,000 to resolve a lawsuit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing it of firing an employee after she complained that a male supervisor had sexually harassed her, a Monday filing in Pennsylvania federal court said.

  • June 03, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Dispensary Supervisor Drops Transgender Bias Suit

    A former supervisor at a Branford, Connecticut, cannabis dispensary has withdrawn her claims that her colleagues targeted her for being transgender and tried to get her in trouble at work by falsely claiming she was high on the job, targeting that allegedly led to her termination.

  • June 03, 2024

    Supreme Court Ruling Keeps Amazon Race Bias Suit Alive

    Amazon Music can't sink a Black former worker's suit alleging her responsibilities were reduced and she was placed on a performance improvement plan for complaining about her manager, a New York federal judge said, ruling her claims are viable based on a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision.

  • June 01, 2024

    Blockbuster Summer: 10 Big Issues Justices Still Must Decide

    As the calendar flips over to June, the U.S. Supreme Court still has heaps of cases to decide on issues ranging from trademark registration rules to judicial deference and presidential immunity. Here, Law360 looks at 10 of the most important topics the court has yet to decide.

  • May 31, 2024

    Colo. AI Bias Law Lays 'Foundation' For New State Patchwork

    Colorado's trailblazing legislation for regulating high-risk uses of artificial intelligence is likely to inspire other states to act, although a host of "reservations" about the measure from advocates and even Colorado's governor are likely to result in a fragmented national landscape as other states' legislatures use the measure as a launching point rather than a model they'd want to fully replicate. 

  • May 31, 2024

    PepsiCo Illegally Fired Blind Call Center Worker, EEOC Says

    PepsiCo fired a blind employee after refusing to find a screen-reading tool that worked with its software system to allow him to do his job as a call center worker, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claimed in a suit Friday in North Carolina federal court.

  • May 31, 2024

    Maritime Employees Stiffed On Sick Leave, Wash. Court Told

    A nonprofit representing shipping industry employers and a Washington state marine terminal operator have not been providing longshoremen with paid sick leave in violation of state wage law and a Seattle city ordinance, a longshoreman told a state court.

  • May 31, 2024

    Mass. Town Settles Ex-Superintendent's Gay Bias Suit

    A Massachusetts town settled a former school superintendent's suit claiming he was investigated and fired for exchanging personal texts with a former student because he was gay, shortly after a trial had started.

  • May 31, 2024

    4 Argument Sessions In June Bias Lawyers Should Know

    A group of Republican state attorneys general will urge a federal judge Monday to Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to block regulations implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, and the Fifth Circuit will hear Southwest Airlines’ push to overturn an anti-abortion former flight attendant's win in her religious bias suit. ​​​​​Here are four June argument sessions discrimination lawyers should have on their radar. 

  • May 31, 2024

    Race Bias Suit Against Ga. Housing Authority Trimmed

    A Georgia federal judge has narrowed the scope of a civil rights lawsuit filed by a woman who said she was denied a senior position with a local housing authority after leaders found out she'd sued her prior employer, tossing several claims Friday against the ex-chairman of the authority's board.

  • May 31, 2024

    Pa. Media Co. Must Face Ex-Editor's Age, Disability Bias Suit

    A local media company can't dodge a former editor's lawsuit claiming she was fired and replaced with younger workers for requesting to work from home because of arthritis, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, finding her allegations were detailed enough to move forward.

  • May 31, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Considers IATSE Movie Pay Dispute

    This week, a New York federal judge will hear arguments over the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees' attempt to force a film production company to make wage and benefits payments the union claims it has not made as required under an arbitration award.

  • May 31, 2024

    Former Allstate Lawyer Settles Disability Bias Suit

    A former in-house lawyer at insurance giant Allstate has agreed to settle his dispute with the company alleging he was wrongfully fired because his doctor said he could no longer work on trials because of heart issues.

  • May 31, 2024

    Complaints About BC Tennis Coach Led To Firing, Suit Says

    A former assistant women's tennis coach at Boston College says the head coach of the program "set out on a campaign to undermine and alienate" her out of professional jealousy and gender bias, alleging she was fired in retaliation after complaining to administrators.

  • May 31, 2024

    Store Applicant Wants Pay Range Case In State Court ASAP

    A job applicant told a Washington federal judge not to grant retailer Aaron's bid to appeal to the Ninth Circuit his case accusing it of violating a state requirement to include pay ranges in job advertisements, saying it contradicts the company's claim the suit shouldn't be in federal court.

  • May 31, 2024

    Ex-Penn State Football Team Doc Wins $5.25M Retaliation Suit

    A Pennsylvania jury awarded $5.25 million to a former doctor for the Pennsylvania State University football team who claimed he was fired for reporting that head coach James Franklin pressured him to push student-athletes back onto the field before they were ready, according to a verdict sheet made public Friday.

  • May 31, 2024

    DC Delegate Floats Bill To Create Sexual Harassment Panel

    U.S. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton of the District of Columbia has introduced a bill that would create a national commission to study workplace sexual harassment and recommend changes to lawmakers and regulators. 

  • May 31, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: State Justices To Hear 'Sovereignty' Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for oral arguments at the California Supreme Court regarding whether all public entities are exempt from certain state labor law wage requirements. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 31, 2024

    IBEW Exits Fired Utility Worker's Sexual Harassment Suit

    A Tennessee federal judge cut the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers loose from a fired employee's suit claiming her union stood by while her supervisor sexually harassed her, rejecting arguments from the Memphis utility she worked for that it was unfair to let the IBEW out of the case.

  • May 31, 2024

    EEOC, Hotel Co. Resolve Suit Over Missing Demographic Data

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and a Florida hospitality company told a federal court they've agreed to resolve the agency's lawsuit alleging the company neglected to report demographic information about its employees.

  • May 30, 2024

    Army Vet Again Files Retaliation Suit Against Casino Owners

    A disabled U.S. Army veteran and former table games dealer has again filed suit against Harrah's Casino and its parent company, Caesar's Entertainment, claiming his employment was wrongfully terminated after he requested time off to deal with the aftermath of a fire alarm that triggered his post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • May 30, 2024

    Chamber Backs Home Depot In BLM Slogan Row At 8th Circ.

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce backed Home Depot's challenge of a National Labor Relations Board decision finding the retailer illegally told a worker to remove a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, telling the Eighth Circuit that the board hadn't shown a connection between individual and group actions.

  • May 30, 2024

    ACLU Says Aon Hiring Tools Discriminate On Race, Disability

    The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation said Thursday it has filed a complaint against Aon Consulting Inc. with the Federal Trade Commission alleging it is using deceptive marketing tactics to push hiring technology that the company claims is bias free in contradiction of research showing otherwise.

  • May 30, 2024

    3 Factors That May Underlie EEOC Color Bias Charge Spike

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently published discrimination charge data for fiscal year 2023 revealed a 40% spike in allegations of color bias in American workplaces. Here are three things experts said might help explain that sharp uptick.

Expert Analysis

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

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    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.

  • AI's Baked-In Bias: What To Watch Out For

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    The federal AI executive order is a direct acknowledgment of the perils of inherent bias in artificial intelligence systems, and highlights the need for legal professionals to thoroughly vet AI systems, including data and sources, algorithms and AI training methods, and more, say Jonathan Hummel and Jonathan Talcott at Ballard Spahr.

  • 'Miss Manners' Scenarios Holds Job Accommodation Lessons

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    Robin Shea at Constangy looks at the potentially negative legal consequences for employers who follow some advice recently given in the Washington Post's "Miss Manners" column, and offers solutions of her own.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • Transgender Worker Rights: A Guide For California Employers

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    California employers should know their obligations under overlapping state and federal law to protect the rights of their transgender, nonbinary and gender-nonconforming workers, and implement best practices to avoid discriminating in how they hire and promote, offer medical benefits to, and prevent harassment of these employees, says Michael Guasco at Littler.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Eliminating Recruiting, Hiring Barriers

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    While the recruiting and hiring segment of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan spotlights the potential discriminatory effects of artificial intelligence, employers should note that it also touches on traditional bias issues such as unlawfully targeted job advertisements and application inaccessibility, say Rachel See and Annette Tyman at Seyfarth.

  • A Look Into The Developing Regulation Of Employer AI

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    Although employers' use of artificial intelligence is still limited, legislators and companies have been ramping up their efforts to regulate its use in the workplace, with employers actively contributing to the ongoing debate, say Gerald Hathaway and Marc-Joseph Gansah at Faegre Drinker.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Clarifies Title VII Claim Standards

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    The Second Circuit's recent opinion in Banks v. General Motors, although it does not break new ground legally, comes at a crucial time when courts are reevaluating standards that apply to Title VII claims of discrimination and provides many useful lessons for practitioners, says Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Preventing Systemic Harassment

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    With the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently finalized strategic enforcement plan identifying a renewed commitment to preventing and remedying systemic harassment, employers must ensure that workplace policies address the many complex elements of this pervasive issue — including virtual harassment and workers' intersecting identities, say Ally Coll and Shea Holman at the Purple Method.

  • Cos. Must Reassess Retaliation Risk As 2nd. Circ. Lowers Bar

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    After a recent Second Circuit decision broadened the federal standard for workplace retaliation, employers should reinforce their nondiscrimination and complaint-handling policies to help management anticipate and monitor worker grievances that could give rise to such claims, says Thomas Eron at Bond Schoeneck.