Labor

  • June 10, 2024

    Cozen Sustains NY Growth With Ogletree Labor Expert

    An experienced labor and employment attorney has jumped from Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC to Cozen O'Connor, continuing recent growth in the firm's New York office.

  • June 10, 2024

    UPS Can't Escape Unpaid Security Screening Claims

    A New Jersey federal judge rejected UPS' request to toss claims that the delivery company should pay warehouse workers for the time they spent undergoing security screenings before their shifts started, court records show.

  • June 07, 2024

    Ohio Panel Says School Union Dues Dispute Tied To Contract

    An Ohio state appeals court said five public school employees cannot hash out their claims over unauthorized union dues deductions in court because they draw from a collective bargaining agreement and therefore must be handled administratively.

  • June 07, 2024

    Ill. Judge Unmoved By 2nd Circ. In Starbucks Subpoena Row

    An Illinois federal judge declined to narrow a prior order letting Starbucks subpoena workers to boost its defense against a National Labor Relations Board injunction bid, saying a recent Second Circuit decision faulting the scope of a discovery grant in another Starbucks case doesn't apply.

  • June 07, 2024

    Union Says NYC Hotel Must Pay Severance Arbitration Award

    A hotel workers union urged a New York federal court to force a former operator of a shuttered Marriott hotel in Manhattan to pay $6 million in severance pay stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, saying an arbitrator's award in the union's favor must be enforced.

  • June 07, 2024

    SpaceX Pans NLRB Offer In Injunction Battle

    The National Labor Relations Board's offer to pause an in-house suit against SpaceX is "merely a ploy" to stave off a Fifth Circuit decision backing the company's challenge to the agency's constitutionality, the rocket maker told a Texas federal judge.

  • June 07, 2024

    Southwest Attys Get Pause On 'Punitive' Religious Training

    In finding Friday that an order for several in-house Southwest Airlines attorneys to undergo "religious liberty training" should be permanently placed on hold while an appeal of a flight attendant's Title VII trial win is pending, the Fifth Circuit said the district court had likely exceeded "the scope of the court's civil-contempt authority."

  • June 07, 2024

    NLRB Asks Judge To Make Auto Co. Rehire Union Organizers

    An Arizona electric car manufacturer quashed a nascent union organizing campaign by monitoring two leaders of the drive and then firing them when they persisted, National Labor Relations Board prosecutors claimed in a lawsuit that asks a federal judge to order the company to rehire the workers.

  • June 07, 2024

    Cozen Adds Eckert Seamans Employment Pro In Boston

    Cozen O'Connor brought on a veteran employment lawyer from Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC in Boston, who comes with experience working in the public sector that he said allows him to help companies navigate any type of employment suit that comes their way. 

  • June 07, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: $3.6M Freight Co. Wage Deal Up For Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for the potential initial sign-off on a more than $3.6 million deal to resolve a proposed wage and hour class action against freight carrier Oak Harbor Freight Lines Inc. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • June 07, 2024

    Driver's Wage Action Travels Back To State Court

    The Labor Management Relations Act doesn't preempt a driver's suit accusing two cold storage companies of wage and breaks violations, a California federal judge ruled, sending the case back to state court.

  • June 06, 2024

    NFL Says Labor Law Preempts Ex-Player's Estate's CTE Claim

    The National Football League isn't to blame for a former football player's head trauma, the league told a South Carolina federal judge, arguing federal labor law preempts a negligence claim from a representative of the ex-player's estate.

  • June 06, 2024

    MLBPA Says Bad Bunny Sports Firm Hurt By Its Own Actions

    The Major League Baseball Players Association told a Puerto Rico federal judge that the sports agency linked to music superstar Bad Bunny has grossly overstated the impact it had on the business, arguing it is the agency's actions, not the association's "unreasonable sanctions," that caused injury.

  • June 06, 2024

    Workers Ask NLRB To Reverse Whole Foods BLM Case Ruling

    Wearing Black Lives Matter apparel at Whole Foods is protected under federal labor law, a group of workers argued to the National Labor Relations Board, saying employees wore BLM masks and attire on the job to push the company to confront racial bias in the workplace.

  • June 06, 2024

    NLRB Official Dismisses Union Petition At Conn. Nightclub

    A National Labor Relations Board official has tossed a petition for a union representation election at a New Haven, Connecticut, nightclub, saying some of the workers the union sought to represent are security guards who cannot share a bargaining unit with nonguards.

  • June 06, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs Construction Co. Refusal Of Union's Audit Ask

    The Sixth Circuit upheld a Michigan construction company's defeat of a lawsuit seeking to compel an audit of company contributions to a union local's fringe benefit funds, saying the funds didn't have a valid contract with the company after a collective bargaining agreement expired.

  • June 06, 2024

    Starbucks Can't Justify Union Shirt Crackdown, Judge Says

    Starbucks violated federal labor law by sending baristas home for wearing union T-shirts at a Brooklyn cafe, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, saying the company can't point to a dress code rule to excuse this behavior because it wasn't otherwise enforcing the rule in the region.

  • June 05, 2024

    Union Asks NY Court To Toss Musicians' Representation Row

    An American Federation of Musicians local urged a New York federal court Wednesday to dismiss duty of fair representation claims from two orchestra musicians, arguing that the plaintiffs didn't raise allegations of "any plausible violation" of an arbitration award reinstating the duo.

  • June 05, 2024

    3rd Circ. Revives Union Harassment Claims Against County

    The Third Circuit revived claims Wednesday accusing Hudson County, New Jersey; its department of corrections; and three county employees of retaliating against a corrections officer because of his union activity, saying a federal judge tossed the allegations too soon.

  • June 05, 2024

    Worker's Sexual Harassment Suit Against Fiat Gets Tossed

    A Michigan federal judge has tossed a Fiat Chrysler employee's sexual harassment and retaliation claims against the company over the alleged actions of her union steward, saying the worker hadn't responded to a court order.

  • June 05, 2024

    Feds Sue To Recover $5.3M Stolen From Union In Email Scam

    Boston federal prosecutors said Wednesday they are helping a union recover about $5.3 million stolen through a complex business email compromise scheme.

  • June 05, 2024

    NLRB Official Preserves Union At Seattle Ship Repair Co.

    A group of machinist craft employees at a Seattle ship repair facility can't break away from their union and affiliate with a Carpenters local, a National Labor Relations Board official ruled, saying the multi-craft bargaining unit that has represented the facility's employees since the 1970s should remain in place.

  • June 05, 2024

    Mercedes Illegally Drug Tested UAW Backers, Union Says

    The United Auto Workers accused Mercedes-Benz of committing federal labor law violations, including unlawfully drug testing union supporters, at an Alabama plant where the union recently lost a representation election, according to an unfair labor practice charge obtained by Law360 on Wednesday.

  • June 05, 2024

    Public Input On EEOC/NLRB Memo A Must, US Rep. Says

    A coming joint memorandum from the nation's federal discrimination and labor law watchdogs addressing when workplace speech qualifies as unlawful harassment should be opened to public comment before being published, the Republican chairwoman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee said. 

  • June 04, 2024

    NLRB Judge OKs Hospital's Bonuses For Newly Hired Nurses

    A New York hospital violated federal labor law when it withheld information that its nurses' union requested about recruitment bonuses, but not when it offered those bonuses to a few new hires without discussing it with the union, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Religious Institution Unionization Risks Post-NLRB Decision

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    A recent National Labor Relations Board decision granted Saint Leo University religious exemption from the National Labor Relations Act, potentially setting a new standard for other religious educational institutions, which must identify unionization risks and create plans to address them, say Terry Potter and Quinn Stigers at Husch Blackwell.

  • Prepare Now To Comply With NJ Temp Worker Law

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    New Jersey temporary staffing firms and their clients must prepare now for the time-consuming compliance requirements created by the controversial new Temporary Laborers' Bill of Rights, or face steep penalties when the law's strict wage, benefit and record-keeping rules go live in May and August, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Protecting Workplace Privacy In The New Age Of Social Media

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    The rise of platforms like TikTok and BeReal, that incentivize users to share workplace content, merits reminding employers that their social media policies should protect both company and employee private information, while accounting for enforceability issues, say Christina Wabiszewski and Kimberly Henrickson at Foley & Lardner.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Quiet Quitting Insights From 'Seinfeld'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Paradies Lagardere's Rebecca Silk about George Costanza's "quiet quitting" tendencies in "Seinfeld" and how such employees raise thorny productivity-monitoring issues for employers.

  • Garmon Defense Finds New Relevance As NLRB Stays Active

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    With a more muscular National Labor Relations Board at work, employers should recall that they have access to a powerful yet underutilized defense to state law employment and tort claims established under the U.S. Supreme Court decision in San Diego Building Trades Council v. Garmon, say Alex Meier and Cary Reid Burke at Seyfarth.

  • Eye On Compliance: Cross-State Noncompete Agreements

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    The Federal Trade Commission's recent proposal to limit the application of worker noncompete agreements is a timely reminder for prudent employers to reexamine their current policies and practices around such covenants — especially businesses with operational footprints spanning more than one state, says Jeremy Stephenson at Wilson Elser.

  • Conducting Employee Investigations That Hold Up In Court

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    A recent Maryland federal court decision, which held that Elite Protective Services failed to provide a worker under internal investigation with protections required by his collective bargaining agreement, highlights important steps employers should take to ensure the conclusions of internal reviews will withstand judicial scrutiny, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Memo Shows NLRB Intends To Protect Race Talk At Work

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    A newly released memo from the National Labor Relations Board advising that discussions of racism at work count as protected concerted activity should alert employers that worker retaliation claims may now face serious scrutiny not only from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, but also the NLRB, says Mark Fijman at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Cannabis Co. Considerations For Handling A Union Campaign

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    As employees in Connecticut and across the country increasingly unionize, cannabis employers must understand the meaning of neutrality and the provisions of labor peace agreements to steer clear of possible unfair labor charges, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Handling Severance Pact Language After NLRB Decision

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    Following the National Labor Relations Board’s recent ruling that severance agreements with broad confidentiality or nondisparagement provisions violate federal labor law, employers may want to consider whether such terms must be stripped from agreements altogether, or if there may be a middle-ground approach, says Daniel Pasternak at Squire Patton.

  • Eye On Compliance: Service Animal Accommodations

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    A Michigan federal court's recent ruling in Bennett v. Hurley Medical Center provides guidance on when employee service animals must be permitted in the workplace — a question otherwise lacking clarity under the Americans with Disabilities Act that has emerged as people return to the office post-pandemic, says Lauren Stadler at Wilson Elser.

  • Joint Employment Mediation Sessions Are Worth The Work

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    Despite the recent trend away from joint mediation in employment disputes, and the prevailing belief that putting both parties in the same room is only a recipe for lost ground, face-to-face sessions can be valuable tools for moving toward win-win resolutions when planned with certain considerations in mind, says Jonathan Andrews at Signature Resolution.

  • A Look At NLRB GC's Memos On Misleading Employees

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    The National Labor Relations Board's general counsel recently confirmed her plan to limit what she considers coercive and misleading statements by employers during union organizing drives, and provided some guidance for employers that, if recognized and followed, may keep a company out of legal trouble with the NLRB, says Rebecca Leaf at Miles & Stockbridge.

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