Wage & Hour

  • June 18, 2024

    Va. City Can't Ax Atty's Wrongful Firing Suit Over FMLA Fraud

    A federal judge declined to toss an attorney's suit claiming the Virginia city he worked for illegally fired him and accused him of doctoring a medical form he needed to care for his sick mother, saying he showed the city may have stepped on his medical leave rights.

  • June 18, 2024

    Treasury Finalizes Labor Rules For Bonus Energy Tax Credits

    The U.S. Treasury Department released final labor rules Tuesday for clean energy projects seeking to significantly boost the value of their tax credits, emphasizing due diligence by developers and announcing that more IRS resources will go toward enforcement of the rules.

  • June 17, 2024

    Third Pa. Uber Trial Unlikely As Deadlock Again Looms

    With a second deadlocked jury appearing imminent in the Philadelphia UberBlack employment classification trial, a Pennsylvania federal judge on Monday told attorneys he was skeptical a third trial is on the way to resolve the case.

  • June 17, 2024

    9th Circ. Tosses Cleaner's Appeal In Misclassification Row

    The Ninth Circuit ruled Monday that it lacks jurisdiction over a worker's challenge of a district court's decision refusing to reopen his suit claiming a janitorial franchising company misclassified workers as independent contractors.

  • June 17, 2024

    Shell, HF Sinclair Settle USW's Meme Poster Back Pay Dispute

    Shell Oil and HF Sinclair have settled a dispute over which company is responsible for back pay to a worker who was fired after posting a meme that was found not to be grounds for termination, following the United Steelworkers' bid for enforcement of an arbitration award.

  • June 17, 2024

    Amazon Seeks To Trim Reopened Contractor Wage Suit

    Amazon urged a Washington federal judge to toss claims in a long-running, recently reopened lawsuit alleging the company misclassified drivers as independent contractors, saying the workers still had not provided any concrete evidence to support their claims.

  • June 17, 2024

    Property Preservation Co. Settles 15 Misclassification Suits

    A property preservation company told a California federal court it reached a deal to settle 15 suits claiming it owes workers wages after misclassifying them as independent contractors.

  • June 17, 2024

    Don't Let Farm Org Rewrite Wage Rule Suit, DOL Tells Judge

    A farm group shouldn't be allowed to revise its challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's new wage rule for certain temporary workers, the agency told a Charlotte, North Carolina, federal judge, saying the revision attempt comes too late as the matter is already awaiting the judge's decision.

  • June 17, 2024

    Federal Contractor Wage Bump Gears Up For Supreme Court

    Two outdoor groups urged the Tenth Circuit to press pause on its ruling that President Joe Biden could spike federal contractors' hourly minimum wage, saying they plan to ask for the U.S. Supreme Court's intervention.

  • June 17, 2024

    Delivery Co. Inks $2.9M Deal In Drivers' Misclassification Suit

    A class of package delivery drivers asked a Massachusetts federal judge to sign off on a $2.9 million settlement resolving a lawsuit accusing a delivery company of misclassifying the drivers as independent contractors and illegally docking their pay, saying the average class member will receive $12,000.

  • June 17, 2024

    High Court Will Mull Proof Needed For Wage-Hour Carveout

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it will hear a wage and hour case from a supermarket distributor, teeing up an opportunity for the justices to articulate the standard by which an employer must demonstrate workers are exempt from overtime.

  • June 17, 2024

    Supreme Court Won't Revisit Calif. Law Arbitration Issue

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to revisit a case dealing with the arbitration of claims brought under a California law enabling workers to sue on behalf of the state and other workers for labor violations, an issue the justices decided on in 2022.

  • June 17, 2024

    Justices Pass On Revisiting PAGA Arbitration Issue

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to take another look at the fate of nonindividual claims under California's Private Attorneys General Act when individual claims go to arbitration in a case involving Uber that was previously before the high court.

  • June 14, 2024

    GOP AGs Demand Stay For DOL's H-2A Protections Rule

    Seventeen Republican attorneys general requested a pause on the effective date for the U.S. Department of Labor's final rule covering foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program, telling the court that the rule provides protections that U.S. citizen agricultural workers lack under federal labor law.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Bill Taking Aim At Model Worker Abuse Awaits Gov.'s Pen

    The New York State Assembly greenlighted a bill now headed for the governor's desk that creates new worker protections for models that aim to rein in industry exploitation, legislation that would build a registry of modeling agencies and require them to act as fiduciaries for their workers.

  • June 14, 2024

    Ill. Cannabis Co.'s Payroll Provider Suit Revived

    An Illinois appeals court breathed new life into a cannabis dispensary operator's negligence and negligent misrepresentation​ lawsuit against its accounting firm for incorrectly telling the company it was overtime-exempt and causing it to underpay employees, saying the claims may have been brought in time.

  • June 14, 2024

    Popeyes Accused Of Skimping On Breaks And Wages

    Popeyes made employees in California work through lunch and rest breaks without appropriate pay and provided them with "confusing" wage statements, according to a putative class action lodged in a Los Angeles court.

  • June 14, 2024

    Healthcare Worker's Solo PAGA Claim Heads To Arbitration

    A California state appeals court ruled an employee's individual wage claims under the state's Private Attorneys General Act should be heard in arbitration, overturning a lower court's decision to keep the lawsuit in state court and finding the arbitration agreement encompassed the worker's claims.

  • June 14, 2024

    Former IT Worker Wants Outright Win In FMLA Suit

    A former information technology worker asked a Florida federal court Friday to reconsider a win it denied him in his lawsuit alleging he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, arguing the court should have found his company acted illegally.

  • June 14, 2024

    5 Threats To New DOL Rule Expanding Overtime Eligibility

    A U.S. Department of Labor rule that the agency says would extend overtime protections to an estimated 4.3 million workers in its first year faces opposition in the courts and in Congress that could topple the recently finalized regulations. Here, Law360 reviews five threats to the Biden administration's overtime rule.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Forecast: Class Cert. Args In Four Seasons Layoff Suit

    This week, a New York federal judge will consider a motion to certify a class of former workers at the Four Seasons Hotel New York who claim the hotel violated federal and state law by not notifying them of furloughs and that the hotel denied them contractually required severance. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • June 14, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Delta's $16M Pay Stub Deal Up For Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for potential settlement approval in a pay stubs class action against Delta Air Lines that went to the Ninth Circuit and the California Supreme Court. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • June 14, 2024

    Disability Care Co., DOL Ink $500K Deal To End Wage Suit

    A Virginia care company for people with intellectual disabilities will pay about $500,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it paid employees a flat rate, leading to minimum wage and overtime violations, according to court documents filed Friday.

  • June 13, 2024

    Apple Workers' Suit Says Women Are Paid Less For Same Work

    A pair of Apple workers lodged a proposed class action in California state court Thursday claiming that the company has systematically paid thousands of women less than their male counterparts for substantially similar work for years.

  • June 13, 2024

    New Evidence Triggers Amended Misclassification Complaint

    Growers accusing a chicken farm of misclassifying them as independent contractors can amend their suit, a South Carolina federal judge ruled Thursday, agreeing that new evidence they obtained could expand the suit's reach.

Expert Analysis

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • AI In Accounting Raises OT Exemption Questions

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    A recent surge in the use of artificial intelligence in accounting work calls into question whether professionals in the industry can argue they are no longer overtime exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, highlighting how technology could test the limits of the law for a variety of professions, say Bradford Kelley at Littler and Stephen Malone at Peloton Interactive.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.