Wage & Hour

  • July 23, 2024

    As NCAA Loses On Athlete Pay, Economic Realities Shine

    The Third Circuit's ruling that NCAA athletes may plausibly plead they are employees who are owed wages for the time they spend on sports underscores how its long-standing multifactor test for entitlement to pay remains the starting point for a variety of scenarios, attorneys told Law360.

  • July 23, 2024

    Rising Star: Gibson Dunn's Ryan Stewart

    Ryan Stewart of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP helped car rental giant Enterprise dodge $160 million in claims that it illegally collected biometric data from workers when it used their fingerprints to register their arrival at work, on top of other victories he secured for Amazon and sales company Credico, earning him a spot among the employment law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • July 23, 2024

    4 Steps For Keeping Bias Out Of Performance Reviews

    Though regular performance reviews are standard in many jobs, experts warn that bias can easily creep into evaluations and lead to illegal gender- and race-based pay gaps in a time of increased legislative and public focus on pay inequity. Here, experts from both sides of the bar discuss four strategies to ensure performance reviews aren't unfairly hitting protected workers' pocketbooks.

  • July 22, 2024

    State Street Sets Aside $4.2M To Address Wage Discrimination

    Federal financial services provider State Street agreed to set aside $4.2 million to make wage adjustments in the future as part of a settlement to resolve allegations that it discriminated against some women managing directors with its base pay and bonuses, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Harris' Record Evinces Drive To Boost Employee Rights

    While Vice President Kamala Harris' work on employment policy has been less publicized than her other endeavors, experts said the potential Democratic presidential nominee's tenure in Congress makes clear that enhancing workplace protections is a priority for her.

  • July 22, 2024

    Nissan Dealer Can't Escape Ex-Worker's OT Claims

    A Missouri Nissan dealership is still on the hook in a former office manager's lawsuit alleging she was misclassified as overtime exempt, with a federal judge ruling Monday it was still unclear whether the ex-employee's work involved independent decision making that could render her ineligible for overtime premiums.

  • July 22, 2024

    Bankrupt Nursing Homes To Pay $36M To End DOL Wage Suit

    More than a dozen bankrupt nursing homes will have to pay nearly $36 million in a U.S. Department of Labor's suit claiming workers weren't paid full wages after creating "an adversarial" payroll structure, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Approval Sought For $1.2M Deal In Labor Trafficking Suit

    A car parts manufacturer, two recruiting agencies and a group of Mexican engineers who alleged the companies lured them to the U.S. with false promises of high-paying jobs before forcing them to work manual labor for long hours and low wages have reached a tentative $1.2 million settlement.

  • July 22, 2024

    Home Health Co.'s $1M Wage Deal Scores Initial OK

    A post-acute healthcare network will shell out about $1 million to end a suit that claimed it cheated direct support personnel workers out of overtime after misclassifying them as independent contractors, after a New Mexico federal judge approved the deal Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs TSA's Win In Ex-Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Ninth Circuit declined to reinstate a lawsuit alleging the Transportation Security Administration fired an officer for complaining that he faced a hostile work environment, saying he failed to overcome the agency's assertion that he was terminated for refusing to comply with an investigation into alleged criminal activity.

  • July 22, 2024

    Pizza Franchisees Owe $277K After DOL Child Labor Probe

    The operators of 10 pizza restaurant franchises in Nevada owe more than $277,000 for allowing minors to work at times the law does not permit and operate dangerous machinery, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Drivers Urge Court To Keep Amazon Wage Suit Alive

    Delivery drivers accusing Amazon of misclassifying them as independent contractors urged a Washington federal judge not to grant the e-commerce giant's bid to toss the eight-year-old suit, saying their claims are solid enough for this stage of the litigation to continue.

  • July 22, 2024

    Mexican Restaurants To Pay $137K For Wage Violations

    Three Mexican restaurant locations in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont will pay $137,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 126 workers their full tips and wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday.

  • July 22, 2024

    Canada Dry Agrees To Settle OT Dispute For $1M

    Canada Dry has agreed to shell out $1 million to put to rest a Fair Labor Standards Act suit in Pennsylvania federal court claiming it miscalculated workers' overtime pay.

  • July 22, 2024

    Rising Star: Filippatos' Tanvir H. Rahman

    Tanvir Rahman of Filippatos PLLC secured a $12 million settlement for a former Fox News producer who said she was used as a scapegoat during the network's legal battle with Dominion Voting Systems, earning him a spot among the employment law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • July 22, 2024

    Ga. Child Therapists Say Employer Cheated Them Out Of Pay

    A Georgia children's therapy provider has not been paying its registered behavior technicians for the time spent working before appointments, traveling, performing administrative work and attending required training sessions, four ex-workers claimed in a proposed collective action in federal court.

  • July 19, 2024

    Business Groups Want DOL OT Rule Tossed

    A slew of business groups urged a Texas federal court to halt on a nationwide basis the U.S. Department of Labor's rule raising salary thresholds for a federal overtime exemption, arguing they raise identical arguments the court already sided with.

  • July 19, 2024

    FTC Wants To Block Kroger & Albertsons' 'Principal Defense'

    Federal Trade Commission staffers want to block Kroger and Albertsons from using their main defense to an in-house merger challenge — the plan to sell off 579 stores — or otherwise force the companies to produce documents so far protected as privileged, according to a recently public filing.

  • July 19, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Fueling Planes Is Arbitration-Exempt Work

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday affirmed that an airplane fuel pumper can proceed with his unpaid wage claims in federal court rather than in arbitration, ruling his work is involved in the flow of interstate commerce and he is thus a transportation worker exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • July 19, 2024

    Temple U.'s Ken Jacobsen On NCAA-House Deal, What's Next

    Even with a deal of such size and consequence — approximately $2.8 billion, more than 184,000 athletes in the class, all the Power Five conferences named and with decades of court rulings leading up to it — the settlement over name, image and likeness compensation in the Grant House-led class action against the NCAA is best seen as a beginning, rather than an end.

  • July 19, 2024

    NJ Says 3rd Circ. Ruling Backs State Temp Worker Law

    The State of New Jersey called a federal court's attention to a recent Third Circuit decision holding that the bar for issuing preliminary injunctions should be higher, saying the ruling supports its argument opposing a business community request to block a state law regulating protections for temporary workers.

  • July 19, 2024

    $15M Kraft Heinz Wage Deal Nabs Initial OK

    A Wisconsin federal court granted preliminary approval to a $15 million deal resolving claims that Kraft Heinz Foods Co. failed to pay employees for all hours worked and include certain compensation when calculating overtime, finding the deal fair and reasonable.

  • July 19, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: $5M Nurses Wage Deal Up For Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for the potential final approval of a $5 million deal to end a class action against a nurse staffing agency. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • July 19, 2024

    Rising Star: Jackson Lewis' Douglas J. Klein

    Douglas J. Klein of Jackson Lewis PC has defended employers against class and collective actions, including federal court cases involving a "naked" class waiver at Insomnia Cookies and wage-and-hour claims against New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority, earning him a spot among employment law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • July 19, 2024

    Property Management Group Pays $304K For OT Violations

    A Florida property management group paid nearly $304,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 92 workers overtime pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

Expert Analysis

  • 2 Lessons From Calif. Overtime Wages Ruling

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    A California federal court's recent decision finding that Home Depot did not purposely dodge overtime laws sheds light on what constitutes a good faith dispute, and the extent to which employers have discretion to define employees' workdays, says Michael Luchsinger at Segal McCambridge.

  • How To Comply With Chicago's New Paid Leave Ordinance

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    Chicago's new Paid Leave and Paid Sick and Safe Leave Ordinance went into effect earlier this month, so employers subject to the new rules should update leave policies, train supervisors and deliver notice as they seek compliance, say Alison Crane and Sarah Gasperini at Jackson Lewis.

  • How NJ Worker Status Ruling Benefits Real Estate Industry

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    In Kennedy v. Weichert, the New Jersey Supreme Court recently said a real estate agent’s employment contract would supersede the usual ABC test analysis to determine his classification as an independent contractor, preserving operational flexibility for the industry — and potentially others, say Jason Finkelstein and Dalila Haden at Cole Schotz.

  • PAGA Reforms Encourage Proactive Employer Compliance

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    Recently enacted reforms to California's Private Attorneys General Act should make litigation under the law less burdensome for employers, presenting a valuable opportunity to streamline compliance and reduce litigation risks by proactively addressing many of the issues that have historically attracted PAGA claims, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Big Business May Come To Rue The Post-Administrative State

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    Many have framed the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions overturning Chevron deference and extending the window to challenge regulations as big wins for big business, but sand in the gears of agency rulemaking may be a double-edged sword, creating prolonged uncertainty that impedes businesses’ ability to plan for the future, says Todd Baker at Columbia University.

  • Why Justices Should Rule On FAA's Commerce Exception

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    The U.S. Supreme Court should review the Ninth Circuit's Ortiz v. Randstad decision, to clarify whether involvement in interstate commerce exempts workers from the Federal Arbitration Act, a crucial question given employers' and employees' strong competing interests in arbitration and litigation, says Collin Williams at New Era.

  • FLSA Conditional Certification Is Alive And Well In 4th Circ.

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    A North Carolina federal court's recent decision in Johnson v. PHP emphasized continued preference by courts in the Fourth Circuit for a two-step conditional certification process for Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, rejecting views from other circuits and affording plaintiffs a less burdensome path, say Joshua Adams and Damón Gray at Jackson Lewis.

  • After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

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    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

  • FIFA Maternity Policy Shows Need For Federal Paid Leave

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    While FIFA and other employers taking steps to provide paid parental leave should be applauded, the U.S. deserves a red card for being the only rich nation in the world that offers no such leave, says Dacey Romberg at Sanford Heisler.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Brief History Of Joint Employer Rules

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    It's important to examine the journey of the joint employer rule, because if the National Labor Relations Board's Fifth Circuit appeal is successful and the 2023 version is made law, virtually every employer who contracts for labor likely could be deemed a joint employer, say Bruno Katz and Robert Curtis at Wilson Elser.

  • What High Court Ruling Means For Sexual Harassment Claims

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    In its recent Smith v. Spizzirri decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a district court compelling a case to arbitration is obligated to stay the case rather than dismissing it, but this requirement may result in sexual harassment cases not being heard by appellate courts, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • A Closer Look At Feds' Proposed Banker Compensation Rule

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    A recently proposed rule to limit financial institutions' ability to award incentive-based compensation for risk-taking may progress through the rulemaking process slowly due to the sheer number of regulators collaborating on the rule and the number of issues under consideration, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • DOL's New OT Rule Will Produce Unbalanced Outcomes

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    The U.S. Department of Labor's new salary level for the Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemption is about 65% higher than the current threshold and will cause many white collar employees to be classified as nonexempt because they work in a location with a lower cost of living, not because of their duties, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.