More Healthcare Coverage

  • March 29, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Data Breach Suit Against Medical Center

    The Fourth Circuit on Friday revived a proposed class action alleging that Sandhills Medical Foundation Inc. failed to protect the personal information of patients whose data was leaked following a cyberattack, saying the health care provider is not shielded under federal immunity and that the government cannot be substituted as a defendant.

  • March 29, 2024

    Hedge Fund Beats Vaxart Investor's 'Short-Swing' Profits Suit

    A New York federal judge has granted a win to hedge fund Armistice Capital LLC and its managing member in a derivative suit brought by a shareholder of biotechnology company Vaxart Inc., which sought disgorgement of short-swing profits that allegedly were wrongfully obtained by the investment adviser.

  • March 29, 2024

    8 States Seek $122M After Robocaller Allegedly Ignored Ban

    Attorneys general from eight states urged a federal judge to modify an existing injunction barring a businessman from engaging in robocalling or telemarketing campaigns, asserting he has violated that order, should be held in contempt and must pay $122 million.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ohio Justices Split On Attorney's Sanction For Hiding His Past

    The Ohio Supreme Court has given a Cleveland attorney a six-month stayed suspension for omitting information in his application for a physician assistant license about multiple name changes and prior proceedings against him for having child pornography on his computer, which he had created via photo editing to demonstrate a point while serving as a defense expert.

  • March 28, 2024

    Mercy Taps Seasoned Health System GC To Lead Legal Team

    St. Louis-based hospital system Mercy has revealed it will have a new lawyer heading up its legal team starting Monday, with the addition of an experienced in-house healthcare industry counsel who brings more than 30 years of legal experience.

  • March 28, 2024

    Olympus Names New Corporate GC With Deputy Promotion

    Medical technology company Olympus announced that its deputy general counsel was promoted to corporate general counsel of the company's American unit, as part of a major change in leadership that includes the appointment of a new CEO.

  • March 27, 2024

    US Trustee Opposes New Official Committee In Talc Ch. 11

    The U.S. trustee has objected to a bid by an ad hoc group to form an official committee of unsecured commercial creditors in the bankruptcy of talc supplier Whittaker Clark & Daniels, arguing the ad hoc group largely consists of law firms that defended the debtor before it filed its Chapter 11 petition.

  • March 27, 2024

    Discovery Halted Pending Home Health Co.'s Dismissal Bid

    A New York federal judge agreed to stay discovery pending a home healthcare company's forthcoming bid to toss a home health aide's lawsuit alleging the company failed to pay its aides on a weekly basis as required for manual workers in the state.

  • March 27, 2024

    Cleveland Clinic Recruits Texas Health System Atty As CLO

    An experienced healthcare in-house attorney is leaving her post at Texas' Memorial Hermann Health System to join Cleveland Clinic as its top attorney, the Ohio-based healthcare organization announced Wednesday.

  • March 26, 2024

    Pharmacy Owner Gets 42 Months For $25M Kickback Scam

    A medical equipment pharmacy owner was sentenced to 42 months in prison Tuesday for carrying out a $25 million kickback scheme with a patient-leads broker as part of a scheme to falsely bill the federal government for care.

  • March 26, 2024

    Conn. Fertility Doctor Says Law Doesn't Support Distress Claim

    A retired fertility doctor facing a lawsuit for allegedly impregnating a patient with his own sperm wants a Connecticut state court judge to dismiss a claim for negligent infliction of emotional distress, arguing that the accusation amounts to medical malpractice and the plaintiff failed to clear a mandatory procedural hurdle.

  • March 26, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says EMS Transport Without Consent Is Med Mal

    A patient who was transported to a Pennsylvania hospital against his will was effectively making a medical malpractice claim against the emergency medical services technicians and needed to file a "certificate of merit" to back up such a claim, a split Third Circuit panel ruled Tuesday.

  • March 26, 2024

    Nashville Settles Trooper's HIV Bias Suit Over Pulled Job Offer

    Nashville will pay $145,000 to settle a state trooper's disability bias suit alleging the city's police department illegally yanked back a job offer after it found out he was HIV positive, according to an agreement resolving the Tennessee federal court case.

  • March 25, 2024

    COVID 'Cure' Claims Can't Sustain Fraud Suit, 9th Circ. Rules

    A biopharmaceutical company's "enthusiastic" statements to Fox News and others about a potential COVID-19 cure do not amount to fraud and cannot sustain a shareholder lawsuit accusing the company and its top executives of deceiving the market by pretending that a breakthrough was much more consequential than it actually was, the Ninth Circuit ruled on Monday.

  • March 25, 2024

    Fla. Pharmacy Says It Was Cut From Federal PrEP Program

    A Florida pharmacy says it was abruptly shut out of a federal program that provides free access to preexposure prophylaxis HIV-prevention medication, asking a D.C. federal judge on Monday to force the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and two contractors to reinstate the pharmacy to the program.

  • March 25, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Rethink AbbVie Privilege Ruling

    The Third Circuit refused Monday to reconsider a ruling that found AbbVie was unable to show a lower court went against precedent or made errors when ordering the drugmaker to turn over attorney communications from a patent case allegedly meant to delay an AndroGel rival.

  • March 22, 2024

    Robitussin Buyers' Lack Of Receipts Dooms Labeling Cert.

    A New York federal judge on Thursday denied class certification in litigation claiming GlaxoSmithKline lied about the "Maximum Strength" label on certain Robitussin cough syrup products, saying although the plaintiffs' lack of receipts does not warrant GSK's bid for summary judgment, it's enough to dismiss the customers' request for certification.

  • March 22, 2024

    Watchdog Calls To Redo $896M Migrant Transport Deal

    The U.S. General Services Administration must redo an $896 million contract to transport unaccompanied migrant children, after a federal watchdog determined that the deal was awarded to a company whose proposed contract lead may be unqualified to oversee the contract.

  • March 22, 2024

    Md. University Says Psilocybin Trade Theft Suit Belongs In US

    A London-based biochemical company cannot be allowed to escape across the pond with trade secrets related to using psilocybin as a mental health treatment, the University of Maryland, Baltimore, told a federal court, saying the company's minimum contacts with the state was its "months-long fraudulent scheme" to swipe intellectual property.

  • March 22, 2024

    Patient Asks NC Justices To Skip Immunity Review Of Virus Law

    A patient who claims she nearly died from a botched hysterectomy urged the North Carolina Supreme Court to ignore a hospital's bid to expand the immunity healthcare providers can receive under the state's COVID-19 emergency law, arguing the medical providers conflate common law and statutory immunity.

  • March 22, 2024

    Kaiser's Ozempic Coverage Denial Is Discriminatory, Suit Says

    Two Kaiser plans' refusal to cover new prescription weight loss drugs like Ozempic and Wegovy is "without any medical or scientific basis," a Washington state resident told a state court, alleging disability discrimination.

  • March 22, 2024

    Detroit Hospital, Deaf Patient Can't Avoid Trial In Disability Suit

    Detroit's Henry Ford Health System may face a jury trial in a deaf patient's lawsuit claiming she was denied an American Sign Language interpreter, with a Michigan federal judge refusing to grant summary judgment to either the hospital or the patient.

  • March 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Fired Doctor Got Enough Due Process

    The Sixth Circuit backed two Ohio healthcare companies and Wright State University's early wins against a former resident doctor's claims that she was improperly fired for unprofessional conduct, stating that all the parties involved engaged in "more than enough due process" before terminating her.

  • March 21, 2024

    MDL Claims Over Merck's Gardasil Vax Get Trimmed

    Pharmaceutical giant Merck need not face many of the claims by patients who allege their autoimmune conditions were caused by its HPV vaccine, a North Carolina federal judge overseeing multidistrict litigation ruled, saying the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act bars most claims made in the first two bellwethers.

  • March 21, 2024

    VA May Have Acted In Bad Faith On $30M Debt Collection Deal

    The U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals refused to toss a $29.6 million appeal accusing the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs of hampering a contractor's efforts to collect funds from outside insurers, saying the VA may have acted in bad faith.

Expert Analysis

  • What Companies Must Know About Product Recalls

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    Recent recalls of asthma inhalers and Baby Shark toys provide an ideal opportunity to review the most essential steps companies should take when planning and conducting their own product recalls — from notifying government agencies and retaining experts to properly communicating with the public, say Kelly Jones Howell and Judi Abbott Curry at Harris Beach.

  • It's Not You, It's Me: Breaking Up With Mass. FCA Prosecutors

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    A recent Massachusetts U.S. Attorney's Office settlement, which required a hospital to admit to certain facts, continues a state trend away from traditionally defense-friendly nonadmission language and may complicate the prospects of amicably resolving future False Claims Act cases, say Jonathan York and Scott Memmott at Morgan Lewis.

  • 11th Circ. Ruling May Impede Insurers' Defense Cost Recoup

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent Continental Casualty v. Winder Laboratories ruling that insurers cannot obtain reimbursement of defense costs from their insureds where the policy itself does not require such reimbursement is likely to be cited as persuasive authority in Georgia and other states without clear precedent on the issue, say Christy Maple and Robert Whitney at Phelps Dunbar.

  • Benefits Ruling Has ERISA Review Standard Red Flags

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    The Eighth Circuit’s recent McIntyre v. Reliance Standard decision, reversing a nurse's disability benefits win, applies a deferential standard of review that conflicts with rulings issued by other federal circuit courts, and raises concerns about whether the law’s intent is being met, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Cannabis Cos. Must Heed PFAS Risks In Products, Packaging

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    Cannabis businesses and ancillary service providers will have to grapple with evolving PFAS enforcement, litigation and regulations – most recently enacted in Minnesota – and take steps to mitigate risks posed by forever chemicals in their products and packaging, say Malina Dumas and Amy Rubenstein at Dentons.

  • Insurance Insights From 5th Circ. Blue Bell Coverage Ruling

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    The Fifth Circuit's recent ruling that denied Blue Bell insurance coverage for the defense costs incurred from a shareholder lawsuit underscores the importance of coordination of different coverages and policies across programs, and the potential perils of seeking recovery for losses under nontraditional policies, say Geoffrey Fehling and Casey Coffey at Hunton.

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Is This Pastime A Side-Gig? Or Is It A Hobby?

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    The recent U.S. Tax Court decision in Sherman v. Commissioner offers important reminders for taxpayers about the documentation and business practices needed to successfully argue that expenses can be deducted as losses from nonhobby income, says Bryan Camp at Texas Tech.

  • Blunders That Made 'Bakked' Cannabis TM Go Up In Smoke

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    The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s recent denial of National Concessions Group’s application to register the mark “BAKKED” illustrates mistakes that cannabis companies must be wary of in pursuing federal registration as examiners may look beyond the four corners of an application, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Challenging Gov't Use Of Nontraditional White Collar Tools

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    As the government prosecutes white collar cases with an ever-increasing reliance on nontraditional tools — including wiretaps, cooperating witnesses and racketeering charges — defense attorneys must understand how to mount effective defenses against such tools, say Glenn MacKinlay and Dean Elwell at McCarter & English.

  • Top 5 Privacy Cases To Watch, From Chatbots To Geolocation

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    Litigation related to privacy law violations has been on the rise recently, and while some judges have pushed back on the novel theories set forth by plaintiffs, new privacy cases are launched almost every day, including notable ones on topics ranging from chatbots to geolocation, say Sushila Chanana and Rodolfo Rivera Aquino at Farella Braun.

  • When Is AI Development 'Research' Under HIPAA?

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    Using protected health information to develop or improve artificial intelligence often involves navigating the Health Information Portability and Accountability Act Privacy Rule, raising significant questions surrounding when AI development potentially qualifies as research under HIPAA, say Adam Greene and Rebecca Williams at Davis Wright.

  • Defense Counsel Sentencing Lessons From Holmes Case

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    The recent imprisonment of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes highlights fundamental but sometimes overlooked sentencing practice points for white collar defense attorneys, from instilling a sense of narrative urgency in court submissions to researching potential prison facilities, says Jack Sharman at Lightfoot Franklin.

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