Federal

  • July 18, 2024

    Bank Exec's Tax Tip Case Wrongly Axed, Estate Tells DC Circ.

    The estate of a Dutch bank executive asked the D.C. Circuit to overturn a U.S. Tax Court decision denying him a whistleblower award for reporting on tax avoidance schemes, saying the lower court improperly relied on proposed regulations from the Internal Revenue Service.

  • July 18, 2024

    Tax Pros Say Gov'ts Stretching 'Realistic Alternative' Analysis

    Tax authorities including the Internal Revenue Service are overstepping in their use of "realistic alternative" arguments, substituting their own judgment for that of businesses, transfer pricing specialists said Thursday.

  • July 18, 2024

    Tax Court Affirms IRS Whistleblower Award Computation

    The Internal Revenue Service's Whistleblower Office did not abuse its discretion when it set an award at 22% of collected proceeds even though other awards tied to related claims were set at 30%, the U.S. Tax Court said Thursday.

  • July 18, 2024

    Ex-Venable Trusts And Estates Partner Joins Stradling In LA

    Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth PC announced that it launched a trusts and estates practice with the hiring of an experienced Los Angeles-based partner from Venable LLP.

  • July 18, 2024

    Most Top US Cos. To Report Tax Under Aussie Bill, Study Says

    Australia's Senate is expected to consider adoption next month of the world's most extensive public country-by-country reporting rules, which would require 51% of large U.S. multinational corporations to disclose tax arrangements retroactively from July 1, according to a study published Thursday.

  • July 18, 2024

    Final IRS Rules Require Beneficiaries To Take Distributions

    Beneficiaries of retirement account owners who died after starting to take distributions must continue taking the distributions annually, the Internal Revenue Service said Thursday in final regulations on required minimum distributions that rejected feedback saying the requirement was overly complex.

  • July 18, 2024

    Rising Star: Latham's Eric Kamerman

    Eric Kamerman of Latham & Watkins LLP in recent years handled the tax aspects of several multibillion-dollar acquisitions of powerhouses in British soccer and American fashion, earning him recognition as one of the tax attorneys under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • July 18, 2024

    IRS Issues Corp. Bond Monthly Yield Curve For July

    The Internal Revenue Service published Thursday the corporate bond monthly yield curve for July for use in calculations for defined benefit plans, as well as corresponding segment rates and other related provisions.

  • July 18, 2024

    Man Can't Annul Agreement To Pay $2M In Taxes, Court Told

    A federal district court should force a Florida man to pay the over $2 million in taxes, interest and penalties he owes despite his change of heart about an agreement regarding his deficient filings, the government said.

  • July 18, 2024

    Top International Tax Cases To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2024

    Tax attorneys will be tracking several high-stakes cases in the second half of 2024 that could define the bounds of the IRS' ability to craft regulations or lodge direct challenges aimed at what it sees as the tax avoidance maneuvers of multinational corporations. Here, Law360 looks at key international tax cases to follow during the rest of the year.

  • July 17, 2024

    Much Of Pillar 1 Treaty Agreed On, OECD Official Says

    Agreement has been reached on the bulk of a multilateral pact to implement new taxing rights that are part of a revamp of the international tax system and on expansions to a part of the taxing rights plan, an OECD official said Wednesday.

  • July 17, 2024

    Tax Court OKs Added Penalty Over Nixed $20.7M Deduction

    The U.S. Tax Court found Wednesday that a Georgia partnership should be assessed a negligence penalty alongside a previously assessed accuracy penalty tied to a disallowed $20.7 million charitable contribution deduction, agreeing with an argument by the IRS.

  • July 17, 2024

    Spouse Relief Not Available For Errant Refund, Tax Court Says

    A Maryland woman who along with her husband received an erroneous refund from the Internal Revenue Service isn't entitled to innocent spouse relief because that relief is available only for unpaid taxes or deficiencies, the U.S. Tax Court said Wednesday.

  • July 17, 2024

    Tax Court Nixes $22.6M Deduction For Historic Renovation

    The U.S. Tax Court denied Wednesday a $22.6 million deduction to a partnership for a conservation easement on its 11-story historic building in downtown Cleveland, saying the easement did not prevent the scale of development on the property that the partnership had claimed.

  • July 17, 2024

    Tax Court Says IRA Deduction Claim Correctly Rejected

    The Internal Revenue Service correctly disallowed a New Hampshire couple's claimed individual retirement account deduction because they never actually made a contribution to such an account, the U.S. Tax Court said Wednesday.

  • July 17, 2024

    Gov't Views On OECD Risk Guidance Vary, Economists Say

    In allocating risk among different components of a business for transfer pricing purposes, analysts need to consider governments' varying interpretations of guidance from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a panel of economists said Wednesday.

  • July 17, 2024

    Connell Foley Adds Wilson Elser Tax Pro In Group Upgrade

    Connell Foley LLP strengthened its tax and estate team this week with the promotion of several attorneys up to partner and the addition of a mergers and acquisitions and corporate restructuring tax expert previously of counsel at Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP.

  • July 17, 2024

    The Tax Angle: Child Care, Medical Debt, Small Biz Relief

    As talks take place on Capitol Hill over the impact the expiration of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will have on small businesses and child care, here's a peek into a reporter's notebook on a few developing tax stories.

  • July 17, 2024

    IRS Plans August Hearing On Stock Buyback Tax Rules

    The Internal Revenue Service will hold a public hearing Aug. 27 on proposed regulations governing a new excise tax on repurchases of corporate stock, the agency said Wednesday.

  • July 17, 2024

    IRS Issues Fixes For Clean Electricity Credit Regs

    The Internal Revenue Service issued corrections Wednesday that it said fix a number of errors in proposed regulations concerning the clean electricity production and investment tax credits established by the Inflation Reduction Act.

  • July 17, 2024

    Rising Star: Cravath's Kiran Sheffrin

    Kiran Sheffrin of Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP has advised companies from Anheuser-Busch InBev to Valvoline on multibillion-dollar deals, including a $50 billion combination resulting in the formation of pharmaceutical giant Viatris, earning her a spot among the tax law practitioners under age 40 honored by Law360 as Rising Stars.

  • July 17, 2024

    Woman Can't Escape Suit Over Partner's $1.1M FBAR Debt

    A woman whose late romantic partner owed $1.1 million in reporting penalties on hidden financial accounts in France and Switzerland can't stop the government from pursuing a suit against her for half the value of her home, a New York federal court ruled.

  • July 17, 2024

    Baker McKenzie Adds EY Partner To Mexico City Office

    Baker McKenzie has appointed a new partner from EY Mexico to its North American tax practice group in Mexico City.

  • July 16, 2024

    Intracompany Prices Should Reflect Acquired IP, Panelists Say

    When one company buys another for its intellectual property, the subsequent pricing of that asset between the now-related entities should reflect the value of what was acquired, transfer pricing specialists said Tuesday at a conference in Washington, D.C.

  • July 16, 2024

    More Geographic Adjustments 'On The Table' For Amount B

    Countries' ability to make further adjustments for geographic differences in the streamlined transfer pricing approach known as Amount B — part of the OECD's plan for reallocating taxing rights among jurisdictions — is "still on the table," an official from the organization said Tuesday.

Featured Stories

  • New IRS Easement Settlements Put Tax Pros In A Pickle

    Kat Lucero

    The IRS' new settlement program for partnerships that participated in conservation easements that haven't yet ended up in court comes with terms far sweeter than past offers, making it difficult for practitioners to advise clients to take the deal or wait for a better one.

  • Top International Tax Cases To Watch In The 2nd Half Of 2024

    Natalie Olivo

    Tax attorneys will be tracking several high-stakes cases in the second half of 2024 that could define the bounds of the IRS' ability to craft regulations or lodge direct challenges aimed at what it sees as the tax avoidance maneuvers of multinational corporations. Here, Law360 looks at key international tax cases to follow during the rest of the year.

  • The Tax Angle: Child Care, Medical Debt, Small Biz Relief

    Stephen K. Cooper

    As talks take place on Capitol Hill over the impact the expiration of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will have on small businesses and child care, here's a peek into a reporter's notebook on a few developing tax stories.

Expert Analysis

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: July Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy considers cases touching on pre- and post-conviction detainment conditions, communications with class representatives, when the American Pipe tolling doctrine stops applying to modified classes, and more.

  • Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • Reading Between The Lines Of Justices' Moore Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent Moore v. U.S. decision, that the Internal Revenue Code Section 965 did not violate the 16th Amendment, was narrowly tailored to minimally disrupt existing tax regimes, but the justices' various opinions leave the door open to future tax challenges and provide clues for what the battles may look like, say Caroline Ngo and Le Chen at McDermott.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • After Chevron: Uniform Tax Law Interpretation Not Guaranteed

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    The loss of Chevron deference will significantly alter the relationship between the IRS, courts and Congress when it comes to tax law, potentially precipitating more transparent rulemaking, but also provoking greater uncertainty due to variability in judicial interpretation, say Michelle Levin and Carneil Wilson at Dentons.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • How High Court Approached Time Limit On Reg Challenges

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve Board effectively gives new entities their own personal statute of limitations to challenge rules and regulations, and Justice Brett Kavanaugh's concurrence may portend the court's view that those entities do not need to be directly regulated, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • A Tale Of 2 Trump Cases: The Rule Of Law Is A Live Issue

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision this week in Trump v. U.S., holding that former President Donald Trump has broad immunity from prosecution, undercuts the rule of law, while the former president’s New York hush money conviction vindicates it in eight key ways, says David Postel at Henein Hutchison.

  • Industry Self-Regulation Will Shine Post-Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper decision will shape the contours of industry self-regulation in the years to come, providing opportunities for this often-misunderstood practice, says Eric Reicin at BBB National Programs.

  • 3 Ways Agencies Will Keep Making Law After Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court clearly thinks it has done something big in overturning the Chevron precedent that had given deference to agencies' statutory interpretations, but regulated parties have to consider how agencies retain significant power to shape the law and its meaning, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Atty Well-Being Efforts Ignore Root Causes Of The Problem

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    The legal industry is engaged in a critical conversation about lawyers' mental health, but current attorney well-being programs primarily focus on helping lawyers cope with the stress of excessive workloads, instead of examining whether this work culture is even fundamentally compatible with lawyer well-being, says Jonathan Baum at Avenir Guild.